We looked at the 200 Top Indonesian influencers on Instagram and their most recent posts. Moving on from Malaysia and Singapore, we used a variety of tools that identify influencers and some good old manual searching. They have a combined reach of 253 million, much of which is presumably duplicate audiences (given Indonesia’s population is 268 million).

In total, we have analysed 4,000 posts and found a staggering 1,875 unique brands, organisations, companies, or events mentioned. Among them are global brands like Starbucks, Dior, Kiehl’s, Uniqlo, Maybelline and also hundreds of local businesses. This is a massive amount by any measure and talks about the need to not only select your influencers well, but to also have a well-planned engagement approach.

As we have done previously, we broke the profiles down to five influencer groups based on their follower count:

  • Type A: 1.5m – 6m
  • Type B: 201k – 1.5m
  • Type C: 101k – 200k
  • Type D: 61k – 100k
  • Type E: 30k – 60k

Posting frequency does not change much across the different types of influencers, it seems like everyone is publishing new content 5-7 times a week. Some influencers post less frequently, some more than 20 times a week. Contrary to what some believe updating beyond 7 times a week will see Engagement Rate actually drop a lot.

The average engagement rate of Indonesia’s Top 200 influencers on Instagram is 4.62%. This is a great measure to take as a benchmark when planning for your next activation with Indonesian influencers. By comparison, the global average engagement rate for Instagram is only 1.66%.

Interestingly enough the unique number of brands in an influencer’s posts does not significantly differ by influencer type. In other words, from Type A to E, all influencers are actively engaged by brands. In fact, around 46% of all influencer posts are branded, which is high by any measure.

How to choose the best influencers for your next campaign?

It is important to mention that there is always the option that some of the smaller influencers are faking it to seem more credible. In order to minimize any potential issues with potentially fake audiences once the campaign is live, we suggest you start the selection process based on data, but still run through the final list manually. This way you can also harness ideas for briefing the influencers later.

Note that almost every influencer’s Branded Engagement Rate is significantly smaller than their general engagement rate. In other words, if your brand activation outperforms the benchmark, you’ve probably done something very well.

Similarly to other markets, the highest Reach and Engagement Rate is with 100K – 200K (Type C) follower influencers at 5.21% (more than 4x vs Type A).

Indonesian influencers score significantly higher in Engagement Rates than the Malaysian Top (2.48%) and Singaporean Top (2.65%). It’s well known that Indonesians love Social Media and their top influencers seem to be well in tune with what their audiences want. These influencers have some of the highest Engagement Rates we’ve seen anywhere:

Mahen with 26.04% average Engagement Rate

Puyu with 18.74% average Engagement Rate

Jonie with 16.19% average Engagement Rate

Syifa Adinda Negara with 15.94% average Engagement Rate

Adiba Khanza with 15.53% average Engagement Rate

From what we can tell, their Engagement Rates are crazy high mainly because of a comedic presence to their content and they represent their audiences’ age group. Hence, the average Engagement Rate of the top 200 Indonesian influencers on Instagram is 4.62%.

Among the Top 200, most of the influencers can be classified as posting Lifestyle (41%) content, followed by Fashion 31%, Travel 12%, Beauty 8%, and Food 4%. The definition of lifestyle literally means everything we do on a day-to-day basis. With this type of content, influencers typically incorporate the brands into their daily activities from our grocery shopping to our daily make-up routine.

What about Type B and D influencers?

Even though the 100K – 200K (Type C) is the ideal influencer follower range, we have not taken into account the quality of the comments and how much they relate to the brand or product promoted by the influencer. We would suggest prioritising engaging this bracket of influencers first, and then moving either to 60K – 100K (Type D) if the quality of engagements is more important or to 200K – 1.5M (Type B) if reach is more important. Naturally, both types charge you as per their audience size.

Statistically speaking*, the more followers the influencer has the less their Engagement Rate. Bigger audiences are naturally more diverse and difficult to captivate and keep engaged.

*Kruskal-Wallis Test χ2(4) = 31.919, p = <0.001 

TL;DR

  • The top 200 Indonesian influencers have a combined reach of 253 million in the total of their 20 recent posts, which presumably includes duplicate audiences.
  • In the total of 4,000 posts we’ve analysed, there were 1,875 unique brands found.
  • In average, they typically post 5 – 7 times a week but there are cases with some posting more than 20 times a week.
  • In almost all profiles we’ve analysed, their Branded Engagement Rate is typically lower than their general Engagement Rate.
  • Similar to other markets, the highest Reach and Engagement Rate is with Type C (100K – 200K) influencers with 5.21% that is four times higher than Type A influencers.
  • Unlike the Malaysian (2.48%) and the Singaporean (2.65%) markets, Indonesian influencers top the chart with their average Engagement Rate with a whopping 4.62%.
  • Most of the influencers can be classified as posting Lifestyle (41%) content, followed by Fashion 31%, Travel 12%, Beauty 8%, and Food 4%.
  • We would suggest prioritising Type D influencers (60K – 100K) if the quality of the engagement is more important and Type A influencers (200K – 1.5M) if reach is more important.